Other People’s Money 4 – Can’t Say it Better Myself

Great reporting from Sunday’s New York Times. Read the whole story here.

The average investor left out in the cold again. (Photo by Канопус Киля, via Wikimedia Commons.)

The average investor left out in the cold again. (Photo by Канопус Киля, via Wikimedia Commons.)

In many ways, what private equity firms did at Simmons, and scores of other companies like it, mimicked the subprime mortgage boom. Fueled by easy money, not only from banks but also endowments and pension funds, buyout kings like THL upended the old order on Wall Street. It was, they said, the Golden Age of private equity — nothing less than a new era of capitalism.

These private investors were able to buy companies like Simmons with borrowed money and put down relatively little of their own cash. Then, not long after, they often borrowed even more money, using the company’s assets as collateral — just like home buyers who took out home equity loans on top of their first mortgages. For the financiers, the rewards were enormous.

Twice after buying Simmons, THL borrowed more. It used $375 million of that money to pay itself a dividend, thus recouping all of the cash it put down, and then some.

A result: THL was guaranteed a profit regardless of how Simmons performed. It did not matter that the company was left owing far more than it was worth, just as many people profited from the mortgage business while many homeowners found themselves underwater.

Investors who bought that debt are getting virtually nothing in the new deal.

One response to “Other People’s Money 4 – Can’t Say it Better Myself

  1. Agreed. There are too many financial instruments that transfer risk to other parties, but keep the benefit. This is clearly a style of Cleptocracy and not reflective of true capitalism where Risk=Benefit.

    Bill Clinton must be P-O’d today!

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